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International Journal of Mathematical, Engineering and Management Sciences

ISSN: 2455-7749


Modeling Multi-generation Innovation Adoption based on Conjoint effect of Awareness Process

Modeling Multi-generation Innovation Adoption based on Conjoint effect of Awareness Process

Mohini Agarwal
Department of Operational Research, University of Delhi, Delhi-110007, India.

Deepti Aggrawal
Keshav Mahavidyalaya, University of Delhi, Delhi-110007, India.

Adarsh Anand
Department of Operational Research, University of Delhi, Delhi-110007, India.

Ompal Singh
Department of Operational Research, University of Delhi, Delhi-110007, India.

DOI https://dx.doi.org/10.33889/IJMEMS.2017.2.2-008

Received on October 01, 2016
  ;
Accepted on December 13, 2016

Abstract

The prior models in the field of multi-generation diffusion modeling basically concentrated on employing effects of substitution and switching behavior. But little or no importance has been given to the manner in which information about the product is diffused in the marketplace for eventual determination of intergenerational sales. Sales generally happen when users are informed about the characteristic features of the product. Thus, the effect of information flow on adoption of the product is important for evaluating eventual sales. With the aim of inculcating awareness and adoption process as two different factors impacting the overall sales; in this paper we have developed a systematic approach to model the sales for intergenerational diffusion process. The results are verified on sales data from Semiconductor Industry DRAM shipments.

Keywords- Cross-generation shifting, Innovation-diffusion models, Intergenerational diffusion.

Citation

Agarwal, M., Aggrawal, D., Anand, A., & Singh, O. (2017). Modeling Multi-generation Innovation Adoption based on Conjoint effect of Awareness Process. International Journal of Mathematical, Engineering and Management Sciences, 2(2), 74-84. https://dx.doi.org/10.33889/IJMEMS.2017.2.2-008.

Conflict of Interest

Acknowledgements

The research work presented in this paper is supported by grants to the first author from DST, via DST PURSE phase II, India.

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